Creating Customer Journey and Mapping with Brand’s Lifecycle

Who are your customers and what do they want? Learn how to build a customer journey map with this article to engage and retain customers for life.

Creating Customer Journey and Mapping with Brand’s Lifecycle
Creating Customer Journey and Mapping with Brand’s Lifecycle
  • The difference between a lifecycle map and a journey map
  • How to integrate the customer journey with your lifecycle map

Table of contents

The Difference Between a Lifecycle Map and a Journey Map
The Four Steps to Creating a Customer Journey
Step #1: Define the Customer
Step #2: Search for the Conflict
Step #3: Position Your Brand as “The Guide With a Plan”
Step #4: Call the Customer to Action
How to Integrate the Customer Journey With Your Brand’s Lifecycle Map
Iterable Case Study: Fiit.tv
Now, a Recap on Lifecycle Mapping

Historically, people have built brand-centric journeys rather than customer-centric journeys. — Garin Hobbs, Director of Deal Strategy, Iterable

In other words, the customer lifecycle mapping process is only valuable to your marketing and sales teams. After all, no customer ever thinks to themselves that they’re in the “awareness” stage of a brand-centric journey.

  • The four steps to creating a customer journey
  • How to integrate the customer journey with your lifecycle map

The Difference Between a Lifecycle Map and a Journey Map

According to the Interaction Design Foundation, a customer journey map details how a customer and a brand will interact with each other over the course of a lifetime.

A way to walk in your customer’s shoes and chart [their] course as [they] interact with your organization (channels, departments, touchpoints, products, etc.) while trying to fulfill some need or do some job within each stage of the lifecycle.

Both maps are necessary for marketing and sales teams to have. But the difference between the two of them is in perspective.

The Four Steps to Creating a Customer Journey

While marketers can certainly rely on tried-and-true customer research methods like personas or Jobs-to-Be-Done to create their customer map, another method you can use adapts Donald Miller’s framework from his best-selling book, Building a StoryBrand.

Step #1: Define the Customer

To start the process of building a customer journey map, determine who it is that you’re trying to reach.

When we don’t open a story gap in our customers’ minds, they have no motivation to engage us because there is no question that demands resolution. Defining something our customer wants and featuring it in [your brand’s] marketing materials will open a gap.

Of course, what your individual customer desires may be different from our example. However, here are a few broad themes Miller suggests starting with:

  • More time
  • More friends & acquaintances
  • More status
  • More resources to survive
  • More desire to be charitable
  • More meaning

Step #2: Search for the Conflict

The second step of building a customer journey map is to search for the conflict that your individual customer currently faces. This shouldn’t be too difficult, as you probably already have some general idea of what problems your products and services solve for your brand’s customers.

  • Internal, which focus on self-limiting beliefs of the character
  • Philosophical, which are about ideals or a “perfect world”
  • Internal: Could be the fear of losing motivation to work out regularly
  • Philosophical: Could be that her fitness goals are achieved quicker if she works out alongside others

Step #3: Position Your Brand as “The Guide With a Plan”

The third step of building a customer journey map is to position your brand as a guide, and the customer you defined above as the hero.

The guide must have this precise one-two punch of empathy and authority in order to move the hero and the story along. These are the characteristics the hero is looking for, and when [they] sense them, [they] know [they’ve] found [their] guide.

In other words, being the guide positions your brand as the expert who’s helped hundreds of other people like the customer with their products and services.

Step #4: Call the Customer to Action

The fourth and final step of building a customer journey map is calling the customer to action. However, marketers like you know that it’s not as simple as your customer hitting the Add to Cart button and checking out without any issues whatsoever. Many things can prevent a customer from making a purchase.

  • Character completeness
  • Reaching full potential

How to Integrate the Customer Journey With Your Brand’s Lifecycle Map

If you’ve followed the process, you should have a greater understanding of who your customers are, what they want, and how your brand fits into their transformation to attain their desires. But now how do you go about integrating it with your customer lifecycle map?

Iterable Case Study: Fiit.tv

Fiit.tv provides on-demand classes, group workouts, and tailored training plans to support every stage of the fitness journey.

Now, a Recap on Lifecycle Mapping

Marketers may have taken the time to map out the customer lifecycle, but chances are brands have yet to explore another perspective: The journey, in the eyes of the customer.

  1. Search for the conflict
  2. Position your brand as “the guide with a plan”
  3. Call the customer to action

Technology Blogger writing about emerging technologies (pupuweb.com) and marketing/lifestyle (paminy.com)

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